Tag Archives: featured

Yemen Mocca

  • Notes of blueberry, black cherry, and dates
  • Mild acidity
  • Dark roast

This bean has been milled and exported by a woman. Grown in one of the most historic growing regions.

This same woman is in the works to start a non-profit to assist other farmers in her area.

The laborers she uses who do not reside close to the farm are housed within the family home.

Employees of the farm are given salaries and health benefits for themselves and their families. If the taste of this coffee doesn’t get your interest, the story of this bean should!

Sold in the half-pound for affordability and to ensure you are keeping it as fresh as possible between brews!

Yemen Mocca
Yemen Mocca Dark roast coffee

Buy it Here

Stay tuned for more in the near future!

Monsoon Malabar

Monsoon Malabar is a speciality coffee bean from India.

Monsoon Malabar

Traditionally, coffee beans once they are harvested, are laid out on concrete beds to dry in the sun. The Malabar beans follow the same method, however instead of being dried in the sun, they are beaten with the strong monsoon rains for 3-4 months. This causes them to swell up, lose their acidity and hold on to a beautiful smokey flavour present in many espresso blends.

We are excited to be offering more coffee with incredible back stories.

Stay tuned as we release more and more of these unique beans.

A History of Coffee

Kaldi
Kaldi

Coffee has a long and winding story of discovery, starting in the Ethiopian mountainous forests which according to African folklore is where it was first discovered.

GoatOne story has it that Kaldi, a monk, discovered it after his goats had eaten red berries from a specific tree he noticed they would have so much energy that they could not sleep through the night. Kaldi reported his findings to the Abbot of the local monastery who then boiled the berries to create a drink, that he found kept him alert through long hours of evening prayer. The Abbot then spread his discovery to other monks and the love of coffee began.

The drink gained large popularity through Arabia and word was spreading to other countries of this medicinal drink.  In order to keep coffee to themselves, they formed laws to ban the export of fertile beans.  The beans that were being exported were first boiled to render them infertile, and this meant only they could cultivate the coffee plants.  An Asian Indian, Baba Budan, snuck a  few fertile beans with him back to India and began cultivating them there.

Kaldi coffee

Coffee cultivation and trade began in the Arabian Peninsula, and was being grown in the Yemeni district of Arabia.  By the 16th Century coffee was known in Persia, Egypt, Syria and Turkey. European travellers brought back stories of the unusual black beverage by the 17th century, and began to make its appearance across the continent.

As demand grew for coffee cultivation, the Dutch planted coffee in Batavia, and the Island of Java, these plants thrived and soon the Dutch had a successful growing trade in coffee and expanded to the islands of Sumatra and Celebes.

From here beans were cultivated, shipped and enjoyed in  many countries, which is a much longer and more detailed story to tell. Coffee shops and bars  became a way of socializing, enjoying company as well as an ideal  way to start your morning. With coffee’s social aspects the need for it exploded and this brings us to today’s coffee culture.

Espresso pouringThere is so much more to know of the story of how coffee began and landed in countries all over the world.  To many, the idea that it originated in Ethiopia may seem absurd, as we now know and love many other different areas of the world for their coffee cultivation.  Coffee is seen throughout history in many tales, and stories written by travelers or seen in documentation as “the black drink” or descriptions such as this.

The book “Travels and Adventures” written by John Smith (British Traveller) describes drinking a Turkish drink called “Coffa” along his travels as well as enjoying a few cups with Princess Pocahantas. Coffee has had a long and whimsical history of being seen as magic, medicinal, and then as a social norm.

Perhaps after reading, you will see your morning cup as a drink with many more tales to tell.

Indonesian Coffee

Header Indonesian Coffee

These mountain ranges are home to many well-suited micro-climates for coffee plantations. In general ,Indonesia produces coffee with low acidity and strong body which make them a great match when it comes to blending with other coffees, especially more acidic coffee from Central America and East Africa.

Today more than 90% of coffee grown in Indonesia is grown by small holders on farms averaging about one hectare.

Sumatra is the western most island in the Indonesian complex. This area is known for their smooth and sweet body that is well balanced and intense. Notes of cocoa, tobacco, cedar and wood is common for coffee grown in this area. Sumatran coffees usually have a greater acidity which helps to balance its body nicely.

Sulawesi is a primary region for high altitude production. The coffees produced from this area are clean, sound and generally have nutty and warm notes like cinnamon and cardamom. The finish is smooth and soft and has the classic sweetness of the Indonesian region.

Indonesia

Java, found between Bali and Sumatra, are known for their heavy body and overall sweet impression that is smooth, supple and sometimes herbaceous in finish. This area bodes nicely for coffee growth as it has a rich biodiversity and many different climates throughout its mountains. This gives coffee growth the rich soil and weather it needs.

Balinese farmers hold traditional farming systems including the belief in the three causes of happiness. These three causes include:

  1. Good relations with God
  2. Other people
  3. The environment

It is because of this belief that they favour the production of Fairtrade, organic coffee and use organic fertilizers. There love for their people, and their environment help to create wonderful coffee beans all while creating as little disturbance to their environment as possible. Coffees from this region are generally sweet, soft with good consistency and may have subtle notes of bright citrus.

Coffee beans

Most farmers from the Indonesian islands use “wet hulling” to cultivate their beans. In this process, farmers remove the outer skin from the cherries mechanically using a pulping machine. The beans, still coated in their mucilage, are then stored for up to a day. Following this period of time, they are washed and partially dried. The coffee is hulled in a semi-wet state, this gives the beans their classic blue-green hue. This process reduces the acidity and increases the body of the cup. This classic balance of acidity and balance is what we recognize and associate with coffees from this region.

A prized blend from this region is the Mokka Java blend which we at Coyote’s are proud to offer. We also offer Balinese, Sumatran, Javanese and Sulawesi beans.

Indonesia map

Caffeine’s Surprising Effect on Inflammation and Aging

If you enjoy drinking caffeinated coffee or tea, here’s a new reason why this could be a healthy, anti-aging habit for you.

Coffee drinkers tend to live longer than those who don’t drink coffee. And thanks to new research, we’re beginning to have a better understanding of why.

Research published in the journal Nature Medicine in January 2017 shows how consuming caffeine in the form of coffee or tea may be able to protect against age-related inflammation, which is linked with most diseases of aging.

What is inflammation and how is it connected to aging?

Inflammation is an important function of the immune system, helping to fight off infections and remove toxins. But as we age, our bodies become less effective at managing inflammation.

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